Football Minnesota Vikings Wide Receiver Sports Art Miracle Image

Minnesota Vikings Miracle

Football season is getting close so I thought you would like to see, probably, one of my favorite plays of all time was the Minnesota Miracle pass from the Minnesota Vikings quarterback Case Keenum to wide receiver Stefon Diggs last season that saved the Minnesota Vikings season and crushed the New Orleans Saints and moved the Vikings into the NFC Championship Game.

As some of you know I am a sports artist who has created artwork for a number of sports stadiums and arenas, including the Minnesota Vikings US Bank stadium.  Sometimes a sports play comes along that needs to be painted just for the joy of recreating a scene or action.  So here is my interpretation of the great "Seven Heaven" football catch.

Seven Heaven Play

The football play, "seven heaven" is a deep corner route and if the quarterback, in this case, Case Keenum hits the wide receiver, in this case it’s Stefon Diggs, then something heavenly happens.   And in this particular case, one of the greatest plays of all time.  The football play, if you would llike to watch it again, is  here:  

link to a video of the play

.  

Here’s a quick rundown of how the play went down.  There was 10 seconds showing on the clock and it was 3

rd

and 10 .  The Vikings were at their own 39 yard line.  Stefon Diggs runs the seven heaven route, catches the pass, the cornerback misses the tackle (I’m not giving his name as he has had enough hassle about his missed play) and Diggs scores.  It was the first  fourth-quarter, walk-off touchdown in NFL playoff history.  As an aside here is an interesting comment about the

walk-off touchdown.

The football image was painted by sports artist John Robertson and is 6 feet by 8 feet, acrylic on unstretched canvas.

Joe Montana San Francisco 49ers Sports football art

Joe Montana the Greatest

As almost everyone knows Joe Montana, "The Comeback Kid" was one of the greatest football players ever to play the game. Montana started his NFL career in 1979 with San Francisco 49ers and played there 14 seasons.  I can't imagine being on top of my game for 14 years.  Up until 1979 I never lasted more than about six months at the same job.  It wasn't even until I was thirty four before I graduated college.   That means I am older than Montana and he had a fabulous career long before I even began to settle down. 

Montana started and won four Super Bowls and was the first player ever to have been named Super Bowl Most Valuable Player three times. He also holds Super Bowl career records for most passes without an interception (122 in 4 games) and the all-time highest quarterback rating of 127.8. Montana was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2000, his first year of eligibility.  Let's see.  What had I accomplished.  Nothing.  Absolutely nothing.  I shouldn't say "nothing" because I did hold the record for the shortest time holding a job at a plastics manufacturing company.  I started at eight in the morning pulling small plastic gears out of drawers and then placing them in small envelopes and mailing them out to customers.  At nine thirty it was break time.  I asked my supervisor where the bathroom was.  Next to the bathroom door was the front door.  Out I went - the front door - and never went back.  I lasted one and a half hours.  Straight to the beach, I did, I did.  Never looked back.  Try to beat that record, Montana.

Doctor Give Me the News


Would I want to be Joe Montana?  Not now, I wouldn't.  As Montana says, " ... the physical stuff tries to catch up with you.’’  Tries to catch up??.  it does catch up.  The extensive physical problems he suffers is from more than two decades after he ended his NFL career in 1994.  Montana has spent more time at the doctor's than he ever had on the field.   When standing in a swim suit he has more knife cuts on him than a butcher's side of beef.  When he walks, it's like watching a drunk sailor sway side to side.  And painful.   His knee can’t straighten despite a half-dozen surgeries.  And he thinks it is bad now.  Wait until he is my age and has to go to the bathroom four times a night.   He'll be dragging his leg across the bedroom floor.

And then there is the metal problems - potential mental problems. His path to thinking may be affected.   He’s had three neck fusions.  There’s nerve damage in one of his eyes.  “It acts like a lazy eye to some degree because every time you’re tired, it kind of goes wherever it feels like a little bit,’’ Montana said.  I have something like lazy eye only it's in my lazy brain and I kind of wander down to the beach and eat shrimp out of the tide pools.  A doctor said Montana's problem resulted from head trauma.  And Montana said,  “Can’t figure out where that came from.’’  I guess he can't remember the hits. 

The moral of the story.   You think I need to tell you the moral of the story?  That is easy to figure out.  Life after football is bleak.  There, I told you.

 Joe Montana Football painting



The great San Francisco 49er quarterback Joe Montana image . The art painting is 30 inch by 48 inch, ink and acrylic on gallery wrapped frame/stretcher bars.  The orange you see is old newsprint articles about Joe Montana and San Francisco 49ers collaged to the canvas then treated, then inked and painted.  Sports artists by John Robertson paintings

NFL Football Offensive Linemen sports artists John Robertson

NFL Offensive Linemen The "Big Boys" of Football


The offensive linemen plays one of three positions, center, guard or tackle, and usually the biggest players on the team.  I can't think of anything more intimidating in football, or in  most sports, than to have an offensive lineman out in front of a running back.  His job is to make space for the runner.
   Visualize a wedge, snow plow train barreling down deep, snow covered railroad tracks.  And with speed and power this huge wedge plow on the front of the iron, diesel engine throws the snow hundreds of feet off the tracks.

Most offensive linemen are just anonymous monsters, part of this wall of other brutes.  But there are some that have stood out in the NFL.  Some had great nicknames like, " Smash-Mouth" or "Night-Train" or "The Jordon Spreader".  

Gene Upshaw Oakland Raiders


There was Gene Upshaw, Oakland Raiders and a Hall ­of ­Famer.  He played 15 seasons at guard between 1967 and 1981. Upshaw started 207 out of 217 career games and was named to seven Pro Bowls. Upshaw was also a two­-time Super Bowl champion­­ with rings in 1977 and 1981.

 Art Shell Oakland Raiders


 Another great Raider offensive linemen was Art Shell.  At his playing size of 6’5″ and 265 pounds, Shell would  drop his hips and use pounding leverage to clear space for running backs or put up a shield and protect his quarterbacks.

Forrest Gregg Green Bay Packers


One of my favorites is Forrest Gregg of the old Vince Lombardi, Green Bay Packers.  Lombardi said Gregg was greatest player that he ever coached. As a Packer, Gregg brought back five championships to the Green Bay “Frozen Tundra.” In the twilight of his career, he won Super Bowl VI with the Dallas Cowboys.  Gregg played in a then-record 188 straight games between 1956 and 1971. Gregg made nine trips to the Pro Bowl and seven appearances on the First­-Team All­-Pro list.

Anthony Muñoz Cincinnati Bengals


 And who some considered the best offensive lineman of all time is Anthony Muñoz - left tackle, Cincinnati Bengals.  He was the "real deal"  with size, strength, athleticism, and technique.  He played at six feet six inches and weighted two-hundred and seventy-eight pounds. He could create an alleyway that a truck could drive through - or "wall off " a blitzing linebacker.  Munoz played in nine Pro Bowls between 1976 and 1985 and named lead guard on the NFL’s 75th Anniversary All­-Time Team.

About Sports Artists John Robertson Painting



The Lineman painting is approximately 48 inches by 70 inches, acrylic on unstretched canvas.  (That means no stretcher bars or frame)  It hangs like a tapestry or banner.

Football Painting Players Running Back and Tackle Art


The football art painting is 6 feet by 8 feet, acrylic on unstretched canvas.

 Why didn't I play football in high school?  Pain.  Suffering. Didn't make sense to me.  Didn't have the time either because I wanted to go surfing after school.  If I was going to hit anything it was never going to be the school books or another guy on a football field.  All I wanted to do was to hit the beach.  Actually I would climb over the chain-link gym fence at lunchtime and ditch school early to go surfing.  I had a Fifty-Five Ford business coup (great link to photo of a 55 Ford Business Coup similar to what I had) that had no back seat so the surfboard could slide in the trunk and go through where the back seat should have been.  In those early days of surfing there was no surf rack.  The boards either rode inside the car or rested on a towel and tied to the roof with straps wound through the windows.   We did take a football to the beach with us to pass around as we rested between times in the water.  After getting tossed into the ocean and soaked in saltwater a number of times the ball dried out and become hard as a rock.  After a period of time the leather got salt stains on it's surface - and the dogs used it as a salt lick.

Most of the paintings shown on the blog have been sold.  (They sell fast)  But there are a few available.  If you click on the link for Paintings for Sale you can see what is available.  What I suggest is that you contact me for your specific need and I can easily paint something specific for you.  Just clink on the contact page for information.

Football Paintings Patrick Willis #52, Linebacker San Francisco 49ers Art

Patrick L. Willis (born January 25, 1985) is a linebacker for the San Francisco 49ers painting is 11" x 14" oil on drafting film.

I did this painting recently for my cardiologist as a gift for his good care. His favorite team is the 49ers and his favorite player is Willis. When I was having stitches removed by him after my procedure the pain brought tears to my eyes. I asked him if he had a stick to bite down on and he, in his best bedside manner, said, "I'm not taking your leg off". That really gave me comfort but I still continued to whine and cry. The hospital nurse, who held me down as I squirmed with the pain, was very sympathetic to my agony. Pinning my shoulders onto the bed, and In a very soft and loving voice she whispered in my ear, "try child birth"

Patrick Willis is a pretty spectacular football player. In 2007 Willis  was drafted by the 49ers in the first round. He played college football for ("Ole Miss") the University of Mississippi and received All-American honors.  As a senior at Ole Miss, he received the Butkus Award and the Jack Lambert Award as the nation’s top linebacker. A year later as a member of the 49ers, Willis led the NFL in tackles, earned first-team All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors while being named the 2007 AP NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year. Willis has earned Pro Bowl and All-Pro honors in all six years he has played in the NFL. He is the only player to receive the Butkus Award for best linebacker in more than one category. He won the college Butkus Award in 2006 while at Ole Miss and in 2009, he won the professional Butkus Award while with the San Francisco 49ers.  (Info from Wikipedia)


As some of you know I was contracted to paint five paintings for the San Francisco 49ers Levi's Stadium art collection.  I had hoped to have the opportunity to paint Patrick Willis for the stadium but they had me do some other paintings.  This painting for my Dr. was a great opportunity to paint one of my favorite players playing in the NFL now.  The photo at the left is of me in the owner's suite at Levi's Stadium with my painting on the wall.

Chicago Bears art painting of Gail Sayers

The great Chicago Bears running back, number 40 Gail Sayers  Known as "the Kansas Comet".  (NFL) for seven seasons during the 1960s and early 1970s,,  Sayers is a member of both the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the College Football Hall of Fame. His friendship with fellow Chicago Bear Brian Piccolo was the basis for the 1971 movie Brian's Song.

The painting is 10 1/2' by 14 1/2' acrylic and ink on paper mounted on a backing cardboard. Over the backing is newsprint articles ind information about the Chicago Bears  The size does not include the frame.

Favorite Gail Sayers quote, ""There's no way I would have made the Hall of Fame or set any of the records I did by myself. No matter how many yards I gained, whether it was three or 300, someone had to be there to make the block. Well, I played football, but you guys are out here giving a lot to make lives and to save lives. You need each other as much as we need you. Please continue to do what you're doing." Speaking to soldiers.

Football art Cincinnati Bengals Giovani Bernard running back image

Football image, sports art of Cincinnati Bengals Giovani Bernard running back ,  One of the early statements about Bernard was,  “Bernard is the future at running back in Cincinnati”  Obviously the future is now with Bernard who is in contention as a legitimate Rookie of the Year candidate. I watched him on TV in a game a couple of weeks ago and was inspired to do this painting of him.  The painting is 40” by 96” ink and acrylic on unstretched canvas.

Football art Dick Butkus Chicago Bears

One of my favorite players, Dick Butkus, Chicago Bears. I had asked for suggestions on Facebook who to paint nest. My friend Greg suggested Butkus.  Favorite quote from Butkus "I'm not so mean. I wouldn't ever go out to hurt anybody deliberately - unless it was, you know, important, like a league game or something."  The image is about 6 1/2 feet on a 4 feet by 8 feet piece of paper using ink and acrylic.




New York Giants / New England Pairiots image

Sports art. Football art. Painted a small football painting of players from the Superbowl – Image is of New York Giants running back Ahmad Bradshaw 44 and New England Patriots linebacker Tracy White 58. The painting is 8" x 10" on a 11" x 14" piece of drafting film. Ink, acrylic and watercolor.

New York Giants Eli Manning painting

Preview

I had painted this larger than life sports art football painting of New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning a little while back but it seemed appropriate to post it after their win today and their advancement to the championship game.  This large-scale image of Eli is approximately 3 1/2 feat by 7 1/2 feet, acrylic on unstretched canvas.

Denver Broncos Tim Tebow New England Patriots Matthew Slater

Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow (15) is hit by New England Patriots free safety Matthew Slater (18) on his way to a touchdown in the first quarter of an NFL football game.

Painting is 8" x  10"  watercolor and acrylic on a 11" x 14"  sheet of drafting drafting film

Art Philadelphia Eagles and Seattle Seahawks football painting

Painting Art Philadelphia Eagles LeSean McCoy #25 Running Back 5' 11", 208 lbs and Seattle Seahawks linebacker LeRoy Hill #56, 6' 1", 238 lbs  The football art, painting is 16” x 20” acrylic on canvas backed paper.  Here is a quote from Leroy Hill.    “It's the noise. On game day, it sounds almost the same. I want to say Death Valley is louder, but sometimes, I don't know, man, it gets loud, like really loud out here.”


A Cool Brees Forcasted for the Super Bowl in Miami

Football Sports Art by Artist John Robertson
charcoal drawing of football players
Regardless of the Score or Situation Drew Brees Exudes Leadership
If I made sixty million dollars for six years to play football for the New Orleans Saints and was starting to run out of time, the last position I would want to play is quarterback - even if I was Drew Brees playing in the Super Bowl XLIV on Sunday. I would like to keep my teeth and legs in one piece. You would not find me walking onto a field and saying to guys like, Indianapolis Colts’ tandem defensive ends, Dwight Freeney (who will probably start) and Robert Mathis, "I’m standing here. Catch me if you can." Because they can catch me – I would not want to walk away from each football game having to ice my whole body. There are easier ways to make ten million dollars a year.
I fully understand guys that take the money and run. But Brees just stands in that pocket – waiting. Drew waits like some hunter waiting for a charging elephant to get close enough before firing off a shot. Me? I’d be out of that pocket so fast. I am not hanging around for that three hundred and twelve pounds of the Colts Defensive Tackle Daniel Muir to come plowing through the Saints’s line. No way.
I would not assume that middle linebacker Gary Brackett is too small to be effective. You may not know this – although the male lion is larger and is the king, it is the lioness that eats first. Brackett has the same great instincts and is "hard-nosed" enough to dominate – whether it is blitzing or covering a receiver he can intimidate a quarterback.
There are safer activities than playing quarterback in the NFL – jumping off a bridge with a big rubber band tied to your ankles or free climbing the face of El Capitán (look mom, no rope) - There must be a better way to finish off the last couple of years of the sixty million dollar contract. If it were me I’d want to be on the sidelines sending in hand signals to a back-up quarterback or, if I must be in the game I’d like to be the placekick holder.
Why is Drew Brees out on the field taking the hits? He likes to throw a football. It is what he is about. Runners run. Kickers kick. Fighters fight. Quarterbacks throw. Brees leads, others follow. I watch.